Event Management Best Practices: The RSVP Process

July 14, 2014

Over the years, ECPR has handled hundreds of events for various clients. While each event may look completely different depending on the client, some variables remain the same. ECPR often takes part in creating invite lists, generating copy for invitations, and in many cases, managing the entire process from conception to completion.

Although there are now several free or affordable resources available to handle online RSVPs, the ECPR team often opts to manage this process manually. While this can be a major undertaking, handling the RSVP process in-house has many benefits.

So, why do we do it? It is imperative that we not only ensure these emails reach invitees’ inboxes, but that individualized attention is given to the folks that require additional assistance in the process.

Below are some event management best practices that may come in handy when manually managing RSVPs for an event.

1. Organization is key — Create a filter in your email settings that enables RSVPs or responses to your invite to be directed to a specific folder. This will prevent flooding your inbox.

2. Always blind carbon copy (“bcc”) — Bcc the recipients of your email to provide anonymity to your guests’ contact info. This will also help you avoid a mistaken “reply-all” situation.

3. Know your email service provider — Before planning your event, check your email service providers’ daily send/receive limits for email distribution (hint: Gmail limits you to 99 cc’d or bcc’d contacts per email). You may have to send multiple emails.

4. Avoid attachments — Rely on the content of your email to provide all the information. Attachments in emails often get overlooked or even sent to spam depending on your recipient’s spam filter.

5. Be timely and responsive — It is a best practice to notify individuals who have RSVP’d that their RSVP was received and recorded. For any additional questions guests ask (which a handful always do), follow up as soon as possible with a concise and clear answer. This may involve keeping a close eye on your event filter folder, but it’s better than letting something slip through the cracks.

Good luck with your next event!

Renna Berman, Administrative Assistant
-Elizabeth Christian & Associates Public Relations